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By Clifford Scott Stagoll

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Extra resources for Deleuze's ''Becoming-Subject'': Difference and the Human Individual

Sample text

40 S. THE MIGHT OF GENERALRULES As a species of naturalinstinct, habit produces impression of anticipabon. But nothing about habit ensuresits consistentoperation. Without direction and limit, habit will sometimes lead to the unjustifiedanticipationof events; that is, to the production of causal relations between eventswhich are not actually connected. Therefore,even habits must be qualified by some other principle in order to produce the subject's characteristicstability. The conditioning of habit-formationis undertakenby what Hume calls 'general ruW to which he attributes 'a mighty influenceon our actions and understanding' (r, 374).

An experienced reasonerconsiders It certain that, under ordinary circumstances,one's striking a nail with a hammerwill drive the nail Into timber, whereas a young child must learn this by observing multiple instancesof constant conjunction between a hammer'sblow and a nail's movement. Deleuze'sexposition of Hume revealsthat the principle of habit presupposes experiý ence whilst remainingdifferent from It, and also that experienceforms the basis of practical decision-maldngon the condition that it Is subject to habit in conjunction with the principles of association.

As a result, they are also the most secure underpinning for study of the consistent operations of imagination, and it is because of this characteristic uniformity that Hume calls 'natural' those relations which derive from the three principles and hold between ideas objectively. The places of consistency, universality and inevitability might suggest that Hume's principles are in some substantialway similarto Kant's categories of the understanding,which would problematizeDeleuze'sreading. But although 'functionallyparallel',there is a crucial difference between them: Hume does not mean that the principles determine allpossible experience,unlike Kant's categories.

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Deleuze's ''Becoming-Subject'': Difference and the Human Individual by Clifford Scott Stagoll


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